Saturday, March 17, 2012

Mr. Punch in the Hunting Field, by Various - Full Text

MR. PUNCH IN THE HUNTING FIELD.

[Cover]
Cover

TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE.

Some pages of this work have been moved from the original sequence to enable the contents to continue without interruption. The page numbering remains unaltered.

[Pg 1]

PUNCH LIBRARY OF HUMOUR

Edited by J. A. Hammerton

Cartoon



Designed to provide in a series of volumes, each
complete in itself, the cream of our national humour,
contributed by the masters of comic draughtsmanship
and the leading wits of the age to "Punch",
from its beginning in 1841 to the present day.







[Pg 2]
DISILLUSIONED

DISILLUSIONED

Awful predicament of young Fitz-Brown, who, having undertaken to see a young lady safely home after a day with the Seaborough Harriers, has lost his way, and has climbed up what he takes to be a sign-post.

[Pg 3]

MR. PUNCH IN THE HUNTING FIELD

cartoon hare


AS PICTURED BY JOHN LEECH, CHARLES KEENE, PHIL MAY,
RANDOLPH CALDECOTT, L. RAVEN-HILL, G. D. ARMOUR,
G. H. JALLAND, ARTHUR HOPKINS, REGINALD CLEAVER,
CECIL ALDIN, TOM BROWNE, W. L. HODGSON AND OTHERS


WITH 173 ILLUSTRATIONS

PUBLISHED BY ARRANGEMENT WITH THE PROPRIETORS OF "PUNCH"

THE EDUCATIONAL BOOK CO. LTD.




[Pg 4]

THE PUNCH LIBRARY OF HUMOUR

Twenty-five volumes, crown 8vo. 192 pages
fully illustrated


LIFE IN LONDON

COUNTRY LIFE

IN THE HIGHLANDS

SCOTTISH HUMOUR

IRISH HUMOUR

COCKNEY HUMOUR

IN SOCIETY

AFTER DINNER STORIES

IN BOHEMIA

AT THE PLAY

MR. PUNCH AT HOME

ON THE CONTINONG

RAILWAY BOOK

AT THE SEASIDE

MR. PUNCH AFLOAT

IN THE HUNTING FIELD

MR. PUNCH ON TOUR

WITH ROD AND GUN

MR. PUNCH AWHEEL

BOOK OF SPORTS

GOLF STORIES

IN WIG AND GOWN

ON THE WARPATH

BOOK OF LOVE

WITH THE CHILDREN

[Pg 5]

EDITOR'S NOTE

horseman
From his earliest days Mr. Punch has been an enthusiast for the Hunting Field. But in this he has only been the faithful recorder of the manners of his countrymen, as there is no sport more redolent of "Merrie England" than that of the Horse and Hound. At no time in Mr. Punch'shistory has he been without an artist who has specialised in the humours of the hunt. First it was the inimitable Leech, some of whose drawings find a place in the present collection, and then the mantle of the sporting artist would seem to have descended to feminine shoulders, as Miss Bowers (Mrs. Bowers-Edwards) wore it for some ten years after 1866. That lady is also represented in the present work, at pages 49 and 111. Later came Mr. G. H. Jalland, many of whose drawings we have chosen for inclusion here. Perhaps the most popular of his hunting jokes was that of the Frenchman exclaiming, "Stop ze chasse! I tomble, I faloff! Stop ze fox!!!" (see page 141). To-day, of course, it is Mr. G. D. Armour whose pencil is devoted chiefly to illustrating the humorous side of hunting; but now, as formerly, most of the eminent artists whose work lies usually in other fields, delight at times to find a subject associated with the hunt. Thus we are able to present examples of Mr. Cecil Aldin and Mr. Raven-Hill in sportive mood, while such celebrities of the past as Randolph Caldecott and Phil May are here drawn upon for the enriching of this, the first book of hunting humour compiled from the abundant chronicles of Mr. Punch.

[Pg 6]
'ARRY OUT WITH THE 'OUNDS

'ARRY OUT WITH THE 'OUNDS


[Pg 7]

MR. PUNCH IN THE HUNTING FIELD

THE HUNTING SEASON

(By Jorrocks Junior)
The season for hunting I see has begun,
So adieu for a time to my rod and my gun;
And ho! for the fox, be he wild or in bag,
As I follow the chase on my high-mettled nag.
I call him high-mettled, but still I must state,
He hasn't a habit I always did hate,
He doesn't walk sideways, like some "gees" you meet,
Who go slantindicularly down the street.
He's steady and well broken in, for, of course,
I can't risk my life on an unbroken horse;
You might tie a torpedo or two on behind,
And though they exploded that horse wouldn't mind
My strong point is costume, and oft I confess
I've admired my get-up in a sportsmanlike dress;
Though, but for the finish their lustre confers,
I would much rather be, I declare, without spurs.
They look very well as to cover you ride,
But I can't keep the things from the animal's side;
And the mildest of "gees," I am telling no fibs,
Will resent having liberties ta'en with his ribs.
Then hie to the cover, the dogs are all there,
And the horn of the hunter is heard on the air;
I've a horn of my own, which in secret I stow,
For, oddly enough, they don't like me to blow.
We'll go round by that gate, my good sir, if you please,
I'm one of your sportsmen who rides at his ease;
And I don't care to trouble my courser to jump,
For whenever he does I fall off in a lump.
Then haste to the meet! The Old Berkeley shall find,
If I don't go precisely as fast as the wind,
If they'll give my Bucephalus time to take breath,
We shall both of us, sometimes, be in at the death!
[Pg 8]
MR. PUNCH DRIVES TO THE FIRST MEET

"WEATHER PERMITTING,"—MR. PUNCH DRIVES TO THE FIRST MEET.


[Pg 9]
A LION IN THE PATH

A LION IN THE PATH?

Oh dear no! Merely the "first open day" after a long frost, and a tom-tit has been inconsiderate enough to fly suddenly out of the fence on the way to covert!

[Pg 10]
TRIALS OF A NOVICE

TRIALS OF A NOVICE

Unsympathetic Bystander. "Taking 'im back to 'is cab, guv'nor?"

[Pg 11]
THE LAST RUN

HOW THE LAST RUN OF THE WOPSHIRE HOUNDS WAS SPOILT.


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